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Amelanchier canadensis

* Common Name:

oblong leaf serviceberry, Canadian serviceberry, chuckleberry

* Genus:

Amelanchier

* Species:

canadensis

Subspecies:

* Family (scientific):

Rosaceae

* Family (common):

Rose

Synonyms :

Amelanchier canadensis var. subintegra, Amelanchier lucida

* Distribution in Canada:

Quebec
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
P.E.I.

 

Photographer: J.S. Peterson @ USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.

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Notice: This species is often confused with others. Only purchase from a specialized, bio-regional native plant nursery. 

Habitat

Ecozone(s):

Atlantic Maritime

Natural Habitat(s):

Prairie/Meadow/Field
Swamp/Marsh (nutrient rich)

Habitat Garden(s):

Prairie/Meadow

Erosion Control?

Characteristics
 
Growing Conditions

* Plant Type:

Shrub

Moisture Requirements: Moist, Wet

Light Requirements: Sun, Partial Shade

Soil Requirements: Loam

Temperature Zone: 3

Evergreen?

No

Average Height:

2 to 6 m

Tolerances:

Salt Tolerant
Juglones Tolerant

Flower Info
 
Fruit/Seed Info

Showy flowers?

Yes

Showy fruit/seeds?

Yes

Bloom time:

Mar to Apr

Edible for humans?

Yes

Flower Colour(s):

White/Cream

Fruit/Seed Colour(s):

Black, Red

Miscellaneous
 
Uses

Fragrant Flowers?

No

Urban Oasis, Stewards in the City, and Eco Superior are specific Evergreen programs that some plants are used in.

Fragrant Foliage?

No

Program & Other Uses:

Urban Oasis
Culinary

Fall colours?

Yes

Distinctive bark?

Yes

Poisonous to humans?

No

Thorns or prickles?

No

Attracts wildlife?

Squirrels
Birds

Larval host for:

Provincial tree/flower?

Plant Watch species?

No

Interesting Tidbits
 
References

This is an East Coast plant that does not enter Ontario. However, the name is commonly used in the nursery trade and generally refers to Amelanchier arborea, or possibly some hybrids. (Miller G.)

The fruits of shadbush (and other serviceberries) are said to be delicious, but often the wild birds, squirrels, raccoons and bears get most of them. The experts say the fruits taste better after they are cooked, which makes the seeds softer and brings out an almondlike flavor. Fresh and canned fruits are made into jams and pies. Aboriginals and European settlers used the dried fruits to flavour pemmican, a type of hard, dried meat and suet that was preserved without salt.

NatureServe

USDA PLANTS Database

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