Plant Detail

Fraxinus latifolia

* Common Name:

Oregon ash

* Genus:

Fraxinus

* Species:

latifolia

Subspecies:

* Family (scientific):

Oleaceae

* Family (common):

Olive

Synonyms :

Fraxinus oregona

* Distribution in Canada:

British Columbia

 

Photographer: Dave Polster.

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Habitat

Ecozone(s):

Pacific Maritime

Natural Habitat(s):

Forest (over 65% cover)
Swamp/Marsh (nutrient rich)

Habitat Garden(s):

Pond Edge/Wetland Garden
Woodland

Erosion Control?

Characteristics
 
Growing Conditions

* Plant Type:

Tree

Moisture Requirements: Moist, Wet

Light Requirements: Sun

Soil Requirements: Clay, Sand, Loam

Temperature Zone: 6

Evergreen?

No

Average Height:

12 to 25 m

Tolerances:

Salt Tolerant
Compaction Tolerant

Flower Info
 
Fruit/Seed Info

Showy flowers?

No

Showy fruit/seeds?

No

Bloom time:

Apr to May

Edible for humans?

No

Flower Colour(s):

Yellow, White/Cream, Green/Brown

Fruit/Seed Colour(s):

Miscellaneous
 
Uses

Fragrant Flowers?

No

Urban Oasis, Stewards in the City, and Eco Superior are specific Evergreen programs that some plants are used in.

Fragrant Foliage?

No

Program & Other Uses:

Aboriginal

Fall colours?

Distinctive bark?

No

Poisonous to humans?

Thorns or prickles?

No

Attracts wildlife?

Larval host for:

Provincial tree/flower?

Plant Watch species?

No

Interesting Tidbits
 
References

This plant is in the endangered species list of COSEWIC (Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada).

May cause dermatitis in humans.

The pulverized fresh roots were used by some native North American Indian tribes to treat serious wounds. A cold infusion of the twigs has been used to treat fevers. The bark is anthelmintic. (Moerman. D)

The wood is hard, brittle, light, coarse grained. A valuable timber tree, it is largely used for making furniture, the interiors of buildings, cooperage etc, and as a fuel. (Uphof. J. C. Th.)

Rare in BC, it may be found in the swamps and estuaries of west Vancouver Island. (E-Flora BC)

Compaction Tolerance

Virginia Tech Dendrology

COSEWIC

Plants for a Future

E-Flora BC

Naturescape British Columbia. Native plant and animal booklet, Georgia Basin
ISBN 0-7726-2639-1

Naturescape British Columbia
Susan Campbell
Publisher N/A
Year of publication N/A
ISBN 0-7726-2639-1



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