Plant Detail

Lilium philadelphicum

* Common Name:

wood lily, western red lily, prairie lily

* Genus:

Lilium

* Species:

philadelphicum

Subspecies:

* Family (scientific):

Liliaceae

* Family (common):

Lily

Synonyms :

* Distribution in Canada:

British Columbia
Alberta
Saskatchewan
Manitoba
Ontario
Quebec
N.W.T.

 

Photographer: Dave Polster.

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* denotes fields that are currently complete in the database. The other information is not yet complete.

Habitat

Ecozone(s):

Boreal Shield
Mixedwood Plains
Prairies

Natural Habitat(s):

Woodland (35-60% cover)
Forest Edge
Prairie/Meadow/Field
Rocky Bluff

Habitat Garden(s):

Bird
Woodland
Prairie/Meadow

Erosion Control?

Characteristics
 
Growing Conditions

* Plant Type:

Wildflower

Moisture Requirements: Dry

Light Requirements: Sun, Partial Shade

Soil Requirements: Sand

Temperature Zone:

Evergreen?

No

Average Height:

30 to 90 cm

Tolerances:

Flower Info
 
Fruit/Seed Info

Showy flowers?

Yes

Showy fruit/seeds?

Yes

Bloom time:

Jun to Aug

Edible for humans?

Flower Colour(s):

Red, Orange

Fruit/Seed Colour(s):

Miscellaneous
 
Uses

Fragrant Flowers?

Urban Oasis, Stewards in the City, and Eco Superior are specific Evergreen programs that some plants are used in.

Fragrant Foliage?

No

Program & Other Uses:

Urban Oasis
Culinary
Medicinal
Aboriginal

Fall colours?

No

Distinctive bark?

No

Poisonous to humans?

Thorns or prickles?

No

Attracts wildlife?

Hummingbirds

Larval host for:

Provincial tree/flower?

Saskatchewan

Plant Watch species?

Interesting Tidbits
 
References

Lilium philadelphicum is now rare in the wild in Manitoba, but is available in native nurseries.
(Prairie Habitats Inc.)

Lilium philadelphicum is also rare in the City of Edmonton. The Edmonton Naturalization Group and Evergreen Associate Kathy Goble are working to educate the public not to pick this plant in peril. When the plant is picked, it is unable to grow back, since all of the energy for reproduction is stored in the leaves. (Edmonton Naturalization Group)

Many tribes gathered the bulbs of wood lily for food and medicine. The bulbs are said to have an excellent flavour. As well, the abundant, nutritious pollen can be dusted on various dishes. Medicinally, the bulbs were once cooked and then applied to sores, bruises, swellings or wounds. They were also used to make a medicinal tea for treating stomach problems, coughs and fevers and for helping women in labour diliver the afterbirth. (Kershaw)

Edmonton Naturalization Group

NatureServe

National Audubon Society: Field Guide to North American Wildflowers, Eastern Region
National Audubon Society
Alfred A. Knopf, New York
1979
ISBN: 0-394-50432-1

Ontario Wildflowers
Linda Kershaw
Lone Pine Publishing
2002
ISBN 1-55105-285-7



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