Plant Detail

Rhus typhina

* Common Name:

staghorn sumac, velvet sumac, sumac vinegar tree

* Genus:

Rhus

* Species:

typhina

Subspecies:

* Family (scientific):

Anacardiaceae

* Family (common):

Cashew

Synonyms :

Rhus hirta, Rhus typhina var. laciniata

* Distribution in Canada:

Ontario
Quebec
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
P.E.I.

 

Photographer: Bill Moses.

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* denotes fields that are currently complete in the database. The other information is not yet complete.

Habitat

Ecozone(s):

Boreal Shield
Atlantic Maritime
Mixedwood Plains

Natural Habitat(s):

Forest Edge
Prairie/Meadow/Field
Riparian (edge)
Rocky Bluff

Habitat Garden(s):

Bird
Hedgerow / Thicket / Windbreak / Screening
Prairie/Meadow

Erosion Control?

Characteristics
 
Growing Conditions

* Plant Type:

Shrub

Moisture Requirements: Dry, Normal

Light Requirements: Sun, Partial Shade

Soil Requirements: Clay, Sand, Loam

Temperature Zone: 4

Evergreen?

No

Average Height:

0.9 to 8 m

Tolerances:

Drought Tolerant
Salt Tolerant
Juglones Tolerant

Flower Info
 
Fruit/Seed Info

Showy flowers?

No

Showy fruit/seeds?

Yes

Bloom time:

Jun to Jul

Edible for humans?

Yes

Flower Colour(s):

Yellow, Green/Brown

Fruit/Seed Colour(s):

Red

Miscellaneous
 
Uses

Fragrant Flowers?

No

Urban Oasis, Stewards in the City, and Eco Superior are specific Evergreen programs that some plants are used in.

Fragrant Foliage?

No

Program & Other Uses:

Stewards in the City
Dyes
Aboriginal

Fall colours?

Yes

Distinctive bark?

Yes

Poisonous to humans?

No

Thorns or prickles?

No

Attracts wildlife?

Birds
Butterflies
Bees

Larval host for:

Provincial tree/flower?

Plant Watch species?

No

Interesting Tidbits
 
References

The tannin-rich fruit, bark and leaves were used to tan hides. The leaves and fruits were boiled to make black ink, and the dried leaves were an ingredient in smoking mixtures. (Kershaw)

Sensory Aspect: Soft, velvet twigs

Sumac has been cultivated in Europe for centuries as an ornamental prized for its vivid fall foliage and distintive fruit.

Aboriginals made a drink from the fruit which tastes like lemonade and has a high vitamin C content.

Fruit and twigs are an important source of food for moose, deer, rabbits, rodents and birds such as pheasant and grouse. (Lauriault)

Attractive to Birds:
Berries are a preferred food source for ruffed grouse, ring-necked pheasant, eastern phoebe, common crow, northern mockingbird, gray catbird, American robin, wood thrush, hermit thrush, eastern bluebird and European starling. It is also used by over 30 other species, and since the fruit hangs on throughout the winter, is another excellent emergency source of food. Honeybees are attracted to the flowers in spring. (Macphail)

Macphail Woods Ecological Fore
http://www3.pei.sympatico.ca/garyschneider/index.html
* Document has moved

NatureServe

USDA PLANTS Database

Trees of Ontario
Linda Kershaw
Lone Pine Publishing
2001
ISBN 1-55105-274-1

Identification Guide to the Trees of Canade
Jean Lauriault
Fitzhenry and Whiteside
1989
ISBN 0-88902-564-9



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