Plant Detail

Fraxinus profunda

* Common Name:

pumpkin ash, red ash

* Genus:

Fraxinus

* Species:

profunda

Subspecies:

* Family (scientific):

Oleaceae

* Family (common):

Olive

Synonyms :

Fraxinus michauxii, Fraxinus tomentosa

* Distribution in Canada:

Ontario

 

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* denotes fields that are currently complete in the database. The other information is not yet complete.

Habitat

Ecozone(s):

Mixedwood Plains

Natural Habitat(s):

Wet Meadow/Prairie/Field (less than 25% cover)
Riparian (edge)
Swamp/Marsh (nutrient rich)

Habitat Garden(s):

Storm Water Retention System (roof/pavement/pond overflow)
Woodland

Erosion Control? No

Characteristics
 
Growing Conditions

* Plant Type:

Tree

Moisture Requirements: Moist, Wet

Light Requirements: Sun

Soil Requirements: Loam

Temperature Zone: 5

Evergreen?

No

Average Height:

20 to 35 m

Tolerances:

Salt Tolerant

Flower Info
 
Fruit/Seed Info

Showy flowers?

No

Showy fruit/seeds?

No

Bloom time:

Apr to May

Edible for humans?

Flower Colour(s):

Purple, Green/Brown

Fruit/Seed Colour(s):

Green

Miscellaneous
 
Uses

Fragrant Flowers?

No

Urban Oasis, Stewards in the City, and Eco Superior are specific Evergreen programs that some plants are used in.

Fragrant Foliage?

No

Program & Other Uses:

Crafts

Fall colours?

Yes

Distinctive bark?

No

Poisonous to humans?

Thorns or prickles?

No

Attracts wildlife?

Birds

Larval host for:

Provincial tree/flower?

Plant Watch species?

No

Interesting Tidbits
 
References

The invasive Emerald Ash Borer beetle from Europe attacks and destroys the entire Fraxinus genus in North America with the possible exception of Fraxinus quadrangulata, blue ash. Blue ash will grow successfully in some locations. BE ADVISED NOT TO TO PLANT ASH TREES IN URBAN AREAS.

This plant is in the endangered species list of COSEWIC listed at S2. (Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada)

Ash samaras are dispersed by wind and water. The seeds require exposure to cool, moist conditions for several months before they germinate. (Kershaw)

The name pumpkin ash is derived from the enlarged base or "butt" that the tree develops when growing on sites that remain wet for most of the growing season. This enlargement can be pumpkin shaped, and provides extra stability for the tree, which is rooted in peaty, wet, and generally unstable soil. Pumpkin ash is sensitive to drought and fire. (Illinois State Museum)

Pumpkin ash has heavy, strong, hard wood. Tool handles and farming implements are made from pumpkin ash. Pumpkin ash is also used for manufacture of boxes, paper pulp, and fuel. (Illinois State Museum)

These rare trees are found in southwestern Ontario and along Lake Erie. (Ontario Trees)

Illinois State Museum

COSEWIC

Ontario Trees

USDA PLANTS Database

Trees of Ontario
Linda Kershaw
Lone Pine Publishing
2001
ISBN 1-55105-274-1



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