Plant Detail

Populus tremuloides

* Common Name:

trembling aspen, quaking aspen, aspen poplar, golden aspen, popple, smalltoothed aspen

* Genus:

Populus

* Species:

tremuloides

Subspecies:

* Family (scientific):

Salicaceae

* Family (common):

Willow

Synonyms :

* Distribution in Canada:

British Columbia
Alberta
Saskatchewan
Manitoba
Ontario
Quebec
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
P.E.I.
Newfoundland
Yukon
N.W.T.
Nunavut

 

Photographer: USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database.

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* denotes fields that are currently complete in the database. The other information is not yet complete.

Habitat

Ecozone(s):

Taiga Plains
Taiga Shield
Boreal Shield
Atlantic Maritime
Mixedwood Plains
Boreal Plains
Prairies
Boreal Cordillera
Pacific Maritime
Montane Cordillera
Hudson Plains

Natural Habitat(s):

Woodland (35-60% cover)
Wet Meadow/Prairie/Field (less than 25% cover)
Rocky Bluff

Habitat Garden(s):

Woodland

Erosion Control?

Characteristics
 
Growing Conditions

* Plant Type:

Tree

Moisture Requirements: Dry, Normal, Moist, Wet

Light Requirements: Sun, Partial Shade

Soil Requirements: Clay, Sand, Loam

Temperature Zone:

Evergreen?

No

Average Height:

12 to 25 m

Tolerances:

Drought Tolerant
Salt Tolerant
Compaction Tolerant

Flower Info
 
Fruit/Seed Info

Showy flowers?

No

Showy fruit/seeds?

No

Bloom time:

Mar to Apr

Edible for humans?

No

Flower Colour(s):

Green/Brown

Fruit/Seed Colour(s):

White

Miscellaneous
 
Uses

Fragrant Flowers?

No

Urban Oasis, Stewards in the City, and Eco Superior are specific Evergreen programs that some plants are used in.

Fragrant Foliage?

No

Program & Other Uses:

Stewards in the City
Medicinal

Fall colours?

Yes

Distinctive bark?

Poisonous to humans?

Thorns or prickles?

No

Attracts wildlife?

Birds
Butterflies
Butterfly Larvae

Larval host for:

eastern tiger swallowtail, viceroy, wood nymphs, admirals

Provincial tree/flower?

Plant Watch species?

Yes

Interesting Tidbits
 
References

Trembling aspen usually reproduces vegetatively. It sends up suckers from spreading roots, producing groups of genetically identical trees that can include thousands of trees covering areas up to 80 ha. (Kershaw) Because of this some consider it the world's largest living organism.

Though the viability of the seed is of short duration, its seeds are produced in such numbers and carried so far, that perpetually the trembling aspen is restocking the land that man has ruined. In the shade of this nurse tree, more permanent forest vegetation can arise. (Peattie)

This tree contains salicin and poplin (relatives and precursers of aspirin) and has been used by various groups as an anti-inflammatory, a diuretic, to reduce fevers, and to treat rheumatism, arthritis, colds and worms.

The wood is used for pulp and paper, but when freshly cut it is too heavy to float down rivers and must be sent to mills by land. Wood matches are made by steaming the logs and peeling off layers. The cheese industry uses aspen containers because it doesn’t affect the odor or taste of cheese. (UBC Arboretum)

Nectar source for tortise shell and angel wing butterflies. (McLeod)
Larval host plant for butterflies recommeded by Monarch Teacher Network (http://www.monarchcanada.org/larval.htm)

This plant is a good source of browse for wildlife and farm stock. This plant's numerous Latin synonymous names can be found at USDA Plant Database.

Compaction Tolerance

UBC Arboretum

Monarch Teachers Network-Canad

NatureServe

USDA PLANTS Database

A Natural History of Trees of Eastern and Central North America
Donald Culross Peattie
Bonanza Books
Year unknown
ISBN unknown

Trees of Ontario
Linda Kershaw
Lone Pine Publishing
2001
ISBN 1-55105-274-1

Robin McLeod
Evergreen Regional Associate



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