The Native Plant Database is retiring on May 31st

15 years ago, Evergreen launched the Native Plant Database as a tool to support our work in urban greenspace stewardship and restoration across Canada. In the years since, our focus as an organization has evolved and unfortunately we are unable to dedicate the necessary resources to maintain the Database in good order. After much deliberation, we have decided that it is necessary to decommission the Native Plant Database, effective May 31st, 2018.

After this date, the Database website will be taken offline. If you have registered an account, your personal information will be deleted from our server, including all saved plant lists. If you would like to save your lists or any plant information, please do so by printing it prior to May 31st.

If possible, it is our hope to transfer the Database to another organization who will continue to expand the work and contributions from Database visitors. If you work for an organization that would be interested in taking on this responsibility, please contact Thomas Hutle at thutle@evergreen.ca. Please note that due to the volume of inquiries we may not be able to respond immediately.

Thank you for your interest, contributions and support of our Native Plant Database.

Plant Detail

Vaccinium angustifolium

* Common Name:

lowbush blueberry, low sweet blueberry

* Genus:

Vaccinium

* Species:

angustifolium

Subspecies:

* Family (scientific):

Ericaceae

* Family (common):

Heath

Synonyms :

Vaccinium angustifolium var. hypolasium, Vaccinium angustifolium var. laevifolium, Vaccinium angustifolium var. nigrum, Vaccinium brittonii, Vaccinium lamarckii, Vaccinium nigrum

* Distribution in Canada:

Manitoba
Ontario
Quebec
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
P.E.I.
Newfoundland
Nunavut

 

Photographer: Brenda Taylor.

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* denotes fields that are currently complete in the database. The other information is not yet complete.

Habitat

Ecozone(s):

Taiga Shield
Boreal Shield
Atlantic Maritime
Mixedwood Plains
Hudson Plains

Natural Habitat(s):

Woodland (35-60% cover)
Forest Edge

Rocky Bluff

Habitat Garden(s):

Rooftop Garden (drought tolerant/shallow rooted)
Woodland

Erosion Control?

Characteristics
 
Growing Conditions

* Plant Type:

Shrub

Moisture Requirements: Dry, Normal, Moist

Light Requirements: Sun, Partial Shade

Soil Requirements: Sand, Loam

Acidophile

Temperature Zone: 2

Evergreen?

No

Average Height:

0 to 60 cm

Tolerances:

Salt Tolerant

Flower Info
 
Fruit/Seed Info

Showy flowers?

No

Showy fruit/seeds?

Yes

Bloom time:

May to Jun

Edible for humans?

Yes

Flower Colour(s):

White/Cream

Fruit/Seed Colour(s):

Blue

Miscellaneous
 
Uses

Fragrant Flowers?

No

Urban Oasis, Stewards in the City, and Eco Superior are specific Evergreen programs that some plants are used in.

Fragrant Foliage?

No

Program & Other Uses:

Culinary
Aboriginal

Fall colours?

No

Distinctive bark?

No

Poisonous to humans?

No

Thorns or prickles?

No

Attracts wildlife?

Squirrels
Birds
Butterflies
Other Showy Insects

Larval host for:

Provincial tree/flower?

Plant Watch species?

No

Interesting Tidbits
 
References

Edible fruit - raw, cooked or used in preserves etc. A very sweet pleasant flavour with a slight taste of honey. Largely grown for the canning industry, it is considered to be the best of the lowbush type blueberries. (Facciola. S.)
The fruit can be dried and used like raisins. (Elias. T. and Dykeman. P.) The fruit is about 12mm in diameter. (Huxley. A.) This is the earliest commercially grown blueberry to ripen. (Britton. N. L. Brown. A.)

A tea is made from the leaves and dried fruits. [Turner. N. J. and Szczawinski. A.]

A tea made from the leaves has been used as a blood purifier and in the treatment of infant's colic. It has also been used to induce labour and as a tonic after a miscarriage. (Moerman. D.)

Fruit is readily eaten by a wide variety of birds and mammals. In some areas, it is a particularly important late summer early fall ptarmigan food. Flower buds are readily eaten by ruffed grouse during the winter and are considered a major food source during February in some areas. Other birds include: the American robin, common crow, eastern bluebird, wild turkey, ruffed grouse, spruce grouse, gray catbird, brown thrasher, rufous-sided towhee, northern mockingbird, black-capped chickadee, red-cockaded woodpecker, starling, cardinal, scarlet tanager, Canada goose, herring gull, quail, and thrushes.
Mammals that feed on the fruit include: the black bear, red fox, gray fox, eastern spotted skunk, raccoon, red-backed vole, fox squirrel, red squirrel, many species of chipmunks and many species of mice. (USDA Forestry Service)

Native American Ethnobotany Da

USDA Forest Service (Trees)

Wildflowers of Algonquin Provincial Park
Dan Strickland and John LeVay
The Friends of Algonquin Park
1993
0-921709-90-0

Shrubs of Ontario
Soper, J.H. and M.L. Heimburger
ROM
1982
ISBN 0-88854-283-6

A Source Book of Edible Plants
Facciola. S. Cornucopia - Kampong Publications 1990 ISBN 0-9628087-0-9

Native American Ethnobotany
Moerman. D.
Timber Press. Oregon.
1998
ISBN 0-88192-453-9
Very comprehensive but terse guide to the native uses of plants. Excellent bibliography, fully referenced to each plant, giving a pathway to further information.



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