Plant Detail

<< Back to search list | < Previous Plant | Next Plant >

Viburnum trilobum var. americanum

* Common Name:

highbush cranberry, American cranberrybush, cranberry viburnum

* Genus:

Viburnum

* Species:

trilobum

Subspecies:

var. americanum

* Family (scientific):

Caprifoliaceae

* Family (common):

Honeysuckle

Synonyms :

Viburnum opulus ssp. trilobum, Viburnum trilobum

* Distribution in Canada:

British Columbia
Alberta
Saskatchewan
Manitoba
Ontario
Quebec
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
P.E.I.
Newfoundland

 

Photographer: I. Dardick Pathology Images Inc..

View more images of this plant.

Do you have an image of this plant to submit?

* denotes fields that are currently complete in the database. The other information is not yet complete.

Add To Plant List  

Notice: This species is often confused with others. Only purchase from a specialized, bio-regional native plant nursery. 

Habitat

Ecozone(s):

Taiga Shield
Boreal Shield
Atlantic Maritime
Mixedwood Plains
Boreal Plains
Montane Cordillera
Hudson Plains

Natural Habitat(s):

Woodland (35-60% cover)
Wet Meadow/Prairie/Field (less than 25% cover)
Riparian (edge)
Swamp/Marsh (nutrient rich)
Lakeshores

Habitat Garden(s):

Pond Edge/Wetland Garden
Butterfly
Bird
Hedgerow / Thicket / Windbreak / Screening
Woodland

Erosion Control?

Characteristics
 
Growing Conditions

* Plant Type:

Shrub

Moisture Requirements: Normal, Moist

Light Requirements: Sun, Partial Shade

Soil Requirements: Sand, Loam

Temperature Zone: 2

Evergreen?

No

Average Height:

2 to 4 m

Tolerances:

Drought Tolerant

Flower Info
 
Fruit/Seed Info

Showy flowers?

Yes

Showy fruit/seeds?

Yes

Bloom time:

May to Jul

Edible for humans?

Yes

Flower Colour(s):

White/Cream

Fruit/Seed Colour(s):

Red, Orange

Miscellaneous
 
Uses

Fragrant Flowers?

Yes

Urban Oasis, Stewards in the City, and Eco Superior are specific Evergreen programs that some plants are used in.

Fragrant Foliage?

No

Program & Other Uses:

Urban Oasis
Stewards in the City
Culinary
Medicinal
Aboriginal

Fall colours?

Yes

Distinctive bark?

No

Poisonous to humans?

No

Thorns or prickles?

No

Attracts wildlife?

Squirrels
Birds
Butterflies
Butterfly Larvae
Bees
Other Showy Insects

Larval host for:

Spring Azure, Gossamer Wing Butterflies

Provincial tree/flower?

Plant Watch species?

No

Interesting Tidbits
 
References

The leaves are maple leaf shaped; the flowers are white flat topped clusters. The berries are persistent throughout the winter.

This shrub is flood, disease and insect tolerant.
(Wildflower Center, LBJ)

The berries make an excellent winter survival food because they remain above the snow and are sweeter after freezing. (Kershaw)

A decoction of the branches has been used to treat a fallen womb after birth.
The bark is laxative. An infusion of the roots has been used to make a person vomit in the treatment of bad blood and fevers. An infusion of the inner bark has been used to treat stomach cramps. (Moerman. D.)

Seeds can be sown in a cold frame in the fall, or greenwood cuttings can be used for propagation.

Habitat Information: High bush cranberry is a medium sized shrub, growing loose, often spindly branches in shade, with bright red berries attractive to birds, good for fall and early winter interest, although they are eaten quickly. The American highbush cranberry hybridizes with its almost identical invasive European counterpart, European highbush cranberry (Viburnum opulus), and this is a threat to the indigenous one. The European highbush berries are less attractive to birds, and so are often seen on the bush in winter long after the native species berries have been eaten.

The easiest way to tell the difference between the two, is by looking closely at the two glands at the base of the leaf. On the European species, they appear like small suction cups where on the native, the top of the gland is rounded. (Evergreen)

Garden Uses: In recent years the Viburnum leaf beetle has been known to completely defoliate this plant, making this choice of plant less popular for gardens.

Insect Relationships: bees feed on nectar or collect pollen, flies and beetles feed on pollen and nectar, while wasps, ants, sawflies, skippers, moths, and plant bugs eat nectar. (Illinois Wildflowers)

Traditional Medicinal Uses: This plant has been used as emetic, febrifuge, laxative, stomachic and for woman's complaints.

Traditional Edible Uses: CAUTION: Eating fruit in large amounts can cause stomach and gastric upset. Fruit is low toxicity, and only causes concern when eaten in large amounts. Juice is acidic and sweeter after a frost. It is rich in vitamin C, and is great as a cranberry substitute. Jam preserves may be made. (Plants for a Future)

USDA PLANTS Database

NatureServe

Native American Ethnobotany Da

David Suzuki Foundation

Wild Flower Centre

Plants for a Future

Trees of Ontario
Linda Kershaw
Lone Pine Publishing
2001
ISBN 1-55105-274-1

Shrubs of Ontario
Soper, J.H. and M.L. Heimburger
ROM
1982
ISBN 0-88854-283-6

<< Back to search list | < Previous Plant | Next Plant >



e-Newsletter