Plant Detail

Toxicodendron radicans

* Common Name:

eastern poison ivy, poison ivy, climbing poison ivy

* Genus:

Toxicodendron

* Species:

radicans

Subspecies:

* Family (scientific):

Anacardiaceae

* Family (common):

Cashew

Synonyms :

Rhus radicans

* Distribution in Canada:

Alberta
Ontario
Quebec
New Brunswick
Nova Scotia
P.E.I.

 

Photographer: Court Noxon.

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* denotes fields that are currently complete in the database. The other information is not yet complete.

Habitat

Ecozone(s):

Boreal Shield
Atlantic Maritime
Mixedwood Plains

Natural Habitat(s):

Woodland (35-60% cover)
Forest Edge
Wet Meadow/Prairie/Field (less than 25% cover)
Riparian (edge)
Rocky Bluff

Habitat Garden(s):

Erosion Control?

Characteristics
 
Growing Conditions

* Plant Type:

Vine

Moisture Requirements: Normal, Moist

Light Requirements: Sun, Partial Shade, Shade

Soil Requirements: Clay, Sand, Loam

Temperature Zone:

Evergreen?

No

Average Height:

15 to 200 cm

Tolerances:

Flower Info
 
Fruit/Seed Info

Showy flowers?

No

Showy fruit/seeds?

Yes

Bloom time:

May to Jul

Edible for humans?

No

Flower Colour(s):

White/Cream, Green/Brown

Fruit/Seed Colour(s):

White

Miscellaneous
 
Uses

Fragrant Flowers?

Urban Oasis, Stewards in the City, and Eco Superior are specific Evergreen programs that some plants are used in.

Fragrant Foliage?

Program & Other Uses:

Aboriginal

Fall colours?

Yes

Distinctive bark?

Poisonous to humans?

Yes

Thorns or prickles?

Attracts wildlife?

Squirrels
Birds
Butterflies

Larval host for:

Provincial tree/flower?

Plant Watch species?

No

Interesting Tidbits
 
References

POISONOUS PARTS: All parts, in all seasons if plant sap contacted. Severe skin irritation upon contact. Symptoms include severe skin redness, itching, swelling, and blisters following direct or indirect contact. Toxic Principle: Urushiol. (Poisonous Plants of N.C.)

Wash affected skin areas as quickly as possible.

It grows in forests, open areas and even rocky areas. It may grow in low dense carpets, or climb other plants or trees as a vine. Look out for its pinnately-growing leaves in groups of threes often, but not always, shiny dark green on top and lighter below. (Ontario Trees)

Control: Children should tell adults or the caretaker at their schoolgrounds for professional removal.

This plant is both a sub-shrub 15-45 cm high and a vine which gets much lengthier. (Wildflower Centre)

It has to be watched for along hiking trails, wastelands and roadsides where it easily adapts to disturbed areas. It loves rich soil. (Boreal Forest)

Boreal Forest

Poisonous Plants of N.C. State

Wild Flower Centre

NatureServe

Wildflowers of the Southern US

Ontario Trees



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